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A Cyberspace Inquisition #3: Insight

Cyberspace can be quite insightful when you choose to look at it in a positive light. We have many positive projects, services and articles in this exploration of wonderments found. Hopefully you too will agree after you are done your own traversing through cyberspace using the list of destinations below.

  • Coolify

    If you enjoy Heroku or Netlify, why not give this self-hosted open source alternative, Coolify a try. This is perfect for deployments of Node.js, PHP and static sites along with one-click deployment for MongoDB, MySQL, PostgreSQL or CouchDB. This all-in-one infrastructure claims it can be installed with one command. I’ve not tried this out as of yet but I may do so in the future.

  • LinkAce

    Very interesting self-hosted project that allows you to manage and archive your bookmarks with you having full control. Some brilliant features have been implemented such as automated link monitoring, automated backups, tags, guest mode/public access and browser bookmarklet to make integration a breezy. I am very interested in giving this a try once I have my physical infrastructure in place and configured. I just can’t decide do I use this or keep using markdown. LinkAce sure makes it tempting to automate some of those annoying tasks you would have to do manually otherwise.

  • SimpleFS

    File sharing can be challenging at times however this self-hosted PHP/SQLite based solution makes it simple and user friendly.

  • PEASS

    Privilege Escalation Awesome Scripts Suite (PEASS) is a handy tool that searches a Windows or Linux system for local privilege escalation paths. Let me explain briefly what privilege escalation is. It’s an act of exploiting a bug, design flaw or configuration oversight in software to gain elevated access to resources that normally would not be accessible. This tool can be quite handy at least from what I seen on the Linux side to point out concerns in the system that needs to be resolved to avoid privilege escalation.

  • grep.app

    A simple service to search across GitHub repositories with options of case sensitive, regular expression and whole words. The results can be filter by repository, path and language. It sure would be nice if it could also search GitLab repositories.

  • SQLite is not a toy database

    Anton Zhiyanov gives a pretty decent review of the power or shall we say capabilities of the SQLite database. A good read in my mind and available in English, Russian and Spanish.

  • DeFi Pulse

    Keep in the know of happenings with decentralized fiance (DeFi) with the latest analytics and rankings of the various DeFi protocols.

  • Emojos

    A great reference service that fetches Mastodon instance custom emoji list. It’s even open source.

  • Workout Manager wger (ˈvɛɡɐ)

    For those that are serious into fitness this free, open source, self-hosted web application allows you to take control managing everything from workout routines, nutrition, diary, calendar, gym management and weight tracker. I’ve yet to get this installed but it’s on my todo list!

  • Syncthing

    Sycthing is a priceless tool I use on a daily bases. It allows you to keep your files continuous synchronized between two or more devices. The biggest feature to me is that you get to choose where your data is stored. I use this to automate my cell phone backups, keep my notes sync’d between my computer and my cell phone and share files between family members. I highly recommend looking into this software and start taking back control and responsibility of your data.

Did you come across something interesting in cyberspace, why not share by contacting me.

I’m publishing this as part of 100 Days To Offload. You can join in yourself by visiting 100DaysToOffload.com.